Med Ed Grand Rounds:Facilitating a midcourse correction: Remediation in Medical Education

Med Ed Grand Rounds:Facilitating a midcourse correction: Remediation in Medical Education

  • Date: Wednesday, Oct 03, 2018
  • Start Time: 12:15 PM
  • End Time: 1:15 PM
  • Location: Claude Moore Medical Education Building, Charlottesville
Presented by Adina Luba Kalet, MD, MPH, FACP, FAAPP, Professor of Medicine and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine Description/Learning Objectives: Remediation in medical education is the act of facilitating a correction for trainees who started out on the journey toward becoming an excellent health professional but have moved off course. The emerging focus on remediation is a direct consequence of the fact that assessment of clinical competence and professionalism in medical training has become more sophisticated and ubiquitous. Initially, educators focused on the struggle to find effective and respectful means to work with individual trainees who don’t meet standards, the vast majority of whom will become practicing professionals. More recently, scholars have begun framing remediation as an anticipatable consequence of mis-match between individuals and institutional assessment culture suggesting the need for proactive individual tailoring of medical education. But ultimately, justifiable competence judgments need to be made. Society allows and expects the medical profession to regulate ourselves, and we must do so as a routine part of medical education. In this talk Dr. Kalet will assert that effective faculty development for remediation is an institutional capacity building process, which requires both individually and institutionally focused approaches. She will propose a set of specific competence areas for individual faculty development and briefly discuss attributes of teachers and theories of learning, and teaching strategies that impact on the ability to remediate effectively. In particular, she will focus on the importance and specifics of developing judgment, facilitation skills, emotional intelligence and courage, and attitudes consistent with effective remediation work. She will conclude by proposing the need to organize these activities so that they are aimed at creating a community of practice in remediation, which is integrated with other important communities of practice (e.g. education and workplace) to inform and be informed by these related activities to ensure the most “competent” health care systems possible. By the end of the session participants will assert that conducting remediation of trainees and colleagues is the responsibility of all medical educators; lay out a framework for both understanding medical competence and identifying and working with individuals who veer off course; discuss faculty’s attitude and skill barriers to engaging effectively with trainees and colleagues who are “not competent;” and argue for the importance of viewing faculty development in remediation as an institutional capacity building activity.  (1 CME credit)