Professional Development

Upcoming Events and Registration

Certificate Program: Curriculum Development - Using the Logic Model Framework to Develop Your Educational Program

Wednesday, December 9, 2020
12 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.50

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Facilitated by: M. Kathryn Mutter, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Director of the Transition Course and the Internship Readiness Course and Andrew S. Parsons, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Hospitalist, and Director of the Foundations of Clinical Medicine Course and Pre-Clerkship Coaching

NOTE: We ask that participants bring a project idea (curriculum or program) with them to the workshop.

Description/Learning Objectives:The Logic Model is a graphic depiction (road map) that presents the shared relationships among the resources, activities, outputs, outcomes, and impact of a planned curriculum. Using this standardized approach to designing a curriculum can help an educator clarify and communicate planned work and intended results. This workshop will explore the Logic Model using real-life examples from UVA School of Medicine. Educators should come prepared with a curricular idea, which can be in the idea phase or application phase, that will be further developed using a Logic Model worksheet. Educators will leave with their own logic model initiated, having thought through the needed inputs and outputs of their proposal, and will be able to further develop their curriculum with the resources provided during this workshop. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: describe the benefits of using the Logic Model framework to map their educational program; specifically delineate curricular goals and outcomes using a standardized approach; and apply the Logic Model framework to develop a curricular program or educational experience. (1 CME credit)

 

Certificate Program: Threshold Concepts for Medical Educators

Tuesday, December 15, 2020
4:30 p.m. – 6 p.m.
CME credits: 1.50

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Facilitated by: Keith Littlewood, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology, Assistant Dean for Clinical Skills Education; and Deborah Barry, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education

Description/Learning Objectives:Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge (TCTK) is an educational framework developed by Land and Meyer in the UK as part of a national project to improve curriculum design. It has been termed one of the most important tools for curriculum improvement by a European educational consortium. TCTK has spread to other parts of the world, although the bulk of publications still arise from Europe and former Commonwealth countries. Its penetration into medicine remains relatively low compared to other educational arenas, but sporadic examples are being described from several specialties. At its core, the founders postulate that there are concepts so fundamental to a discipline that they are required for authentic mastery. This presentation will be based upon several national presentations to simulation and/or education audiences. The first portion will be didactic to acquaint the audience with key concepts. Examples from other disciplines will be given as well. This will be followed by text polling to suggest some candidates for threshold concepts within the participant’s particular discipline. Small group sessions will follow in which these candidates are presented and justified to other members of the groups. The large group will reconvene with report outs or volunteer examples (depending upon time) for consideration by the criteria described in the introduction. Concluding remarks will note the ease of implementation and benefits of this framework. Following this session, participants will be able to: explain the critical attributes of Threshold Concepts; characterize the concept and importance of troublesome knowledge in education; and select candidates for Threshold Concepts within their own educational practice for group discussion. (1.5 CME credits)

 

Journal Club (December) 

Thursday, December 17, 2020
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.00

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Moderated by: Allison J. Bechtel, MD, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology

Article: Gingerich A, Sebok‐Syer S, Larstone R, Watling C. Lingard L. “Seeing but not believing: insights into the intractability of failure to fail” Medical Education 2020, 54(12):1148‐1158. doi.org/10.1111/medu.14271
(1 CME credit)

 

Med Ed Grand Rounds: Assessment to Support Learning

Wednesday, January 13, 2021
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.00

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Presented by John J. Norcini Jr., PhD, Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Academy of Medical Educators, Research Professor, SUNY Upstate Medical University, President Emeritus of FAIMER

Description/Learning Objectives: Historically, assessment has focused almost exclusively on making decisions about students and trainees (summative assessment). More recently, there has been increasing interest in using assessment to support learning (formative assessment). In some settings, educators have approached the desire to support learning by simply providing more feedback from summative assessments. However, feedback provided in this context is not always used effectively by learners and it can engender strong emotions that may impact learning. This session will describe the roles of formative assessment in learning with a focus on providing feedback and enhancing performance through retrieval practice. We will also explore the growing interest in creating systems of assessment that incorporate components aimed at making decisions as distinct from those designed to support learning. A framework for factors to consider in developing an effective system of assessment will be presented. By the end of the session the participants will be able to outline the roles of assessment in supporting learning; examine the impact of assessment on the ability to provide feedback to learners; describe a systems perspective on assessment; and define characteristics of a good system of assessment.
(1 CME credit)

 

Certificate Program: Authentic Workplace Assessment through the Use of EPAs

Thursday, February 11, 2021
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.00

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Presented by Maryellen E. Gusic, MD, Professor of Medical Education and Pediatrics and Senior Advisor for Educational Affairs

Description/Learning Objectives: In this highly interactive session, participants will engage in hands-on exercises to refine their skills in assessment through direct observation of learner performance. Using recordings to prompt application of performance metrics, participants will define how the behaviors being observed map to expectations of performance. Together the audience will practice translating this data into recommendations about the level of supervision a learner needs in future activities. Participants will also create narrative feedback for learners that highlights information that the learners will need to design their ongoing learning goals. Following this session, participants will be able to: discuss the importance of assessment in competency-based education; apply shared expectations for performance in assessment activities; convert data from direct observation of learner performance into a trust decision; and provide rich narrative to engage learners in a reflective dialogue about their performance and be prepared to complete assessments within the UVA EPA program. (1CME credit)

Certificate Program: Authentic Workplace Assessment through the Use of EPAs

Tuesday, February 23, 2021
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.00

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Presented by Maryellen E. Gusic, MD, Professor of Medical Education and Pediatrics and Senior Advisor for Educational Affairs

Description/Learning Objectives: In this highly interactive session, participants will engage in hands-on exercises to refine their skills in assessment through direct observation of learner performance. Using recordings to prompt application of performance metrics, participants will define how the behaviors being observed map to expectations of performance. Together the audience will practice translating this data into recommendations about the level of supervision a learner needs in future activities. Participants will also create narrative feedback for learners that highlights information that the learners will need to design their ongoing learning goals. Following this session, participants will be able to: discuss the importance of assessment in competency-based education; apply shared expectations for performance in assessment activities; convert data from direct observation of learner performance into a trust decision; and provide rich narrative to engage learners in a reflective dialogue about their performance and be prepared to complete assessments within the UVA EPA program. (1CME credit)

 

The Annual Review

Wednesday, April 7, 2021
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.00

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Facilitated by Susan M. Pollart, MD, MS, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development and Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor of Family Medicine and Troy S. Buer, PhD, Director for Faculty Development and Assistant Professor of Medical Education

Description/Learning Objectives: The University of Virginia policy mandates an annual performance review for all faculty. A regular and thoughtful performance review is a critical tool for professional advancement in an academic career. A major goal of the annual review is to assist faculty in assessing their progress toward promotion or attainment of career goals. This session will describe the importance of the annual review, review its essential elements, and list available resources. By the end of this session, participants will be able to describe the fundamentals of an annual review, define reasons an annual review is important and valuable, and list resources available to assist with preparing for the annual review process. (1 CME credit)

Certificate Program: Crossing Time and Space Boundaries with Simulation: Evidence-Based Practice Tips

Wednesday, April 28, 2021
12 noon – 1:00 p.m.
CME credits: 1.00

Zoom Virtual Meeting. Zoom link will be provided after registration.

Facilitated by M. Kathryn Mutter, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Director of the Transition Course and the Internship Readiness Course and Margaret K. Sande, MD, MS, MSHPEd, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Director of the GME Simulation Lab in the ERC

Description/Learning Objectives: Telesimulation is the combined use of telecommunication and simulation resources to educate and train learners remotely. This teaching modality is a remarkable application of technology to expand the accessibility of simulation beyond time and physical boundaries. This interactive workshop will explore various applications and arrangements for telesimulation.  Participants will see evidence-based concepts and best practices and identify ways to successfully implement telesimulation in teaching and learning. By the end of this session, participants will review different applications and arrangements for telesimulation; examine evidence-based best practices for optimizing telesimulation; and identify how to apply practical tips for successful telesimulation performance from shared experiences. (1 CME credit)