Certificate Series

2018 Recipients
Certificate of Commitment to Faculty Development in Medical Education

Topics

Advanced: Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions

Presented by Christine Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Course description/learning objectives: Before attending this session, participants should either have completed the NBME online tutorial or have attended the Basic Workshop for Writing MCQs. In this session, techniques and strategies for writing MCQs that test higher-order cognition will be reviewed. Participants will practice improving their own questions with partners in the workshop. After participating in this workshop, the learner will be able to distinguish test items that assess higher-order cognition from those that assess lower-order cognition and transform their lower order items to higher-order items.

Arts-Based Medical Education: Professional Development for Medical Educators

Presented by Madaline B. Harrison, MD, Professor of Neurology and Director, Huntington’s Disease Clinic, Department of Neurology; and Marcia Day Childress, PhD, Associate Professor of Medical Education (Medical Humanities), and Director, Programs in Humanities

Course description/learning objectives: This session introduces participants to narrative medicine as one mode of arts-based medical education. The active learning component will be a one-hour workshop in which participants learn to apply techniques from narrative medicine—close reading, textual analysis and interpretation, and free writing—to engage skills in close listening and attention to language that in turn enhance core clinical skills of communication, perspective-taking, and tolerance of ambiguity and uncertainty. Experiencing a narrative medicine exercise first hand will enable participants to understand how these strategies enhance learners’ clinical skills development. Following the exercise, the group will discuss examples of curriculum development using narrative medicine methods and strategies and brainstorm about using narratives in their own teaching. The session will serve as an incubator to stimulate development of narrative-based teaching exercises appropriate to participants’ disciplinary perspectives. Participants will also receive information about resources, consultation, and further training in narrative medicine. Following this session, participants will become familiar with narrative medicine strategies used to teach core clinical skills in medical education; engage in an active learning exercise in which they will apply specific techniques from narrative medicine: close reading, analysis/interpretation, and free writing; gain an understanding of how these techniques apply to clinical skills development; and discuss specific applications of this approach to their own teaching.

Authentic Workplace Assessment through the Use of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs)

Presented by Maryellen E. Gusic, MD. Professor of Medical Education & Senior Advisor for Educational Affairs

Course description/learning objectives: In this highly interactive session, participants will engage in hands-on exercises to refine their skills in assessment through direct observation of learner performance.  Using recordings to prompt application of performance metrics, participants will work in small groups to define how the behaviors being observed map to expectations of performance.  Together the audience will practice translating this data into recommendations about the level of supervision a learner needs in future activities.  Participants will also create narrative feedback for learners that highlights information that the learners will need to design their ongoing learning goals.  This session will focus on assessment of learner performance in clinical settings/scenarios.  It will also be of interest to teachers who would like to learn more about the use of EPAs as a framework for teaching and assessment and to those who would like to refine their skills in applying standards for assessment and providing effective feedback to learners.  Following this session, participants will be able to:  discuss the importance of assessment in competency-based education; apply shared expectations for performance in assessment activities; convert data from direct observation of learner performance into a trust decision; and provide rich narrative to engage learners in a reflective dialogue about their performance.

Classroom Assessment Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

Presented by Weichao (Vera) Chen, PhD, Instructional Designer, Office of Medical Education

Course description/learning objectives: After a brief discussion on the relationship between assessment, learning, and teaching, we will explore some of the classroom assessment strategies, such as concept mapping and analogies. This jigsaw-style session will involve hands-on practice in groups and peer teaching. Computers will be available in the room, but you are also welcome to bring your own laptop. Following this session, participants will be able to identify the approach underlining a classroom assessment strategy (using the framework “assessment for, as, and of learning”); evaluate the possibility of applying the classroom strategies surveyed during the session in their own teaching; and explain how to utilize at least one of the assessment strategies discussed today to enhance their students’ learning.

Clinical Teaching “on the Fly”: A Microskills Framework

Presented by Andrew M. Wolf, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: Teaching in the clinical setting often occurs “on the fly,” and so opportunities for effective teaching and can be lost. However, there are methods clinical teachers can use – especially when pressed for time– to engage students and residents in their learning and also to provide critically important feedback. Following this workshop, participants will be able to recognize opportunities for “teaching on the fly,” employ specific strategies to enhance clinical teaching when time is significantly limited, and utilize these strategies to provide effective feedback to learners.

Comprehensive Approach to Remediating the Learner in Need:  Assessment, Coaching and Triage Decisions

Presented by Karen M. Warburton, MD, FASN, Associate Professor of Medicine, Vice Chief for Faculty Development (Nephrology Division), and Director, GME Professional Development, Department of Medicine and Andrew Parsons, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hospitalist, and Lead Coach for Clinical Reasoning

Course description/learning objectives: Remediation is often an uncomfortable topic. Struggles may include poor performance on an examination, interpersonal conflicts, or underlying impairment. To effectively help these learners, we must embrace a culture in which it is accepted that a certain proportion of our trainees will struggle at some point. This workshop will offer attendees an approach to identifying and coaching learners who struggle across a wide variety of domains of clinical performance. Attendees will work in small groups in which they will review cases and will work together to assess, and develop a remediation plan for, learners with a variety of deficits. The presenters will share their experiences in the development of remediation programs at two academic institutions. The audience will then have the opportunity to brainstorm some strategies for implementing remediation programs in their own departments. Following this session, participants will be able to demonstrate a process for the comprehensive evaluation of a learner in need; create individualized learning plans for learners who struggle with clinical reasoning, organization and efficiency, and professionalism; and propose an approach to the development of an effective coaching and remediation program.

Concept Mapping for Engaging Students in Meaningful Learning 

Presented by Weichao (Vera) Chen, PhD, Instructional Designer, Medical Education

Course description/learning objectives: Interested in using a mindtool to engage your students in meaningful learning? This workshop will discuss teaching with concept mapping/mind mapping. We will introduce you to free concept mapping software and possible instructional strategies. Computers will be available in the classroom, but feel free to bring your laptops if you prefer! Following this session, participants will be able to describe at least two key strategies to make learning meaningful; state the key components of concept maps; create a simple concept map using Lucidchart to address a topic by adding, removing, and/or editing relevant concepts and links; share one’s concept map with colleagues using Lucichart; and identify a way to integrate concept mapping into teaching to facilitate students’ meaningful learning. Due to the size of this classroom, participation is limited to 16 attendees.

Conducting Research in Medical Education

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and James R. Martindale, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education Support.

Course description/learning objectives: Many medical school faculty have been trained to conduct basic science, clinical, or translational research but have no experience conducting social sciences research in education. This workshop will focus on framing an educational research question, conducting qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and drawing appropriate conclusions from the data gathered. Following this session, participants will be able to frame a research question and design a study that answers the question.

Designing Effective Surveys

Presented by Lisa Rollins, PhD, Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Director of Scholarship

Course description/learning objectives: How often have you or your colleagues enthusiastically uttered “We should develop a survey to ask others about that!”? Surveys are an accessible and often expedient way to gather information. However, the process of creating a survey is far more involved than merely throwing a group of questions together on a page. Come learn about how to create surveys so you can utilize this methodology more effectively in your practice, your department, or in other aspects of your work. This session will be interactive and does not require previous experience. At the end of this session, participants will be able to: describe various considerations when designing a survey; create effective questions, keeping in mind some common pitfalls in question design; describe some helpful hints when developing surveys; and identify procedures that affect survey response rate.

Developing a Research Question with Significance and Selecting a Conceptual Framework for your Educational Scholarship

Presented by Elizabeth B. Bradley, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Director of Curriculum Evaluation, James Martindale, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Director of Test Development, and Maryellen E. Gusic, MD, Professor of Medical Education & Senior Advisor for Educational Affairs

Course description/learning objectives: Your research question drives it all and the conceptual framework within which you ground this question provides the foundation for crafting a question that will focus your research and guide the design of your study. These critical first steps prepare you to select appropriate methods and determine the analyses you will conduct to demonstrate significant results. In this interactive session, participants will explore and practice these important components of conducting and publishing medical education research. By the end of the session, participants will be able to explain the steps necessary to make the case that a research topic is important; describe what a conceptual framework is; examine how to incorporate conceptual frameworks into medical education research; and develop a sample research question using a conceptual framework.

Developing Learning Activities in Ethics and Professionalism: Design Specific Activities or Just Do What You Do Every Day, Intentionally

Presented by Donna T. Chen, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Biomedical Ethics, Public Health Sciences, and Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences; Thread Leader for Ethics and Professionalism.

Course description/learning objectives: Whether intentionally or not, we all impart lessons in ethics and professionalism to our learners every day. This interactive workshop will trace the ethics and professionalism thread through the four-year formal, informal, and hidden curricula. We will discuss the importance of role models to learning in these domains, including what students report learning from role models — clinician and non-clinician faculty, staff and administrators — and how that interacts with what they are “taught” in formal sessions about ethics and professionalism. We will talk about ways to make role modeling in ethics and professionalism more intentional without sounding “preachy.” We will also evaluate and critique some prepared ethics/professionalism learning activities as well as brainstorm to help create new ones for participants who bring an idea for this purpose. Following this workshop, participants will be able to explain how students learn ethics and professionalism from the formal, informal, and hidden curricula; will be able to list ways to improve their role modeling in this regard; and will be able to evaluate and critique different methods for “teaching” ethics and professionalism.

Developing Surveys 101

Presented by Presented by Lisa K. Rollins, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of Scholarship, Department of Family Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: Surveys are an accessible and often expedient way to gather information. However, the process of creating a survey is far more involved than merely throwing a group of questions together on a page. Come learn about how to create surveys so you can utilize this methodology more effectively in your practice, your department, or in other aspects of your work. This session will be interactive and does not require previous experience. Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to describe various considerations when designing a survey Create effective questions, keeping in mind some common pitfalls in question design; describe some helpful hints when developing surveys; and identify procedures that affect survey response rate.

Development of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and Anne E. Chapin, Med, Managing Director of the Clinical Skills Center and Assistant Professor of Medical Education

Course description/learning objectives: Following this session, participants will be able to describe an OSCE and its role in medical education, explain the components of a performance exam, describe a case development timeline and understand the importance of standard setting for providing feedback to learners and faculty.

Effective Mentoring Relationships

Presented by Sean W. Reed, MD, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine & Director, Generalist Scholars
Program

Course description/learning objectives: What distinguishes an outstanding mentor from others? This workshop will focus on specific characteristics of particularly effective mentoring and the outcomes/benefits such interactions can achieve. Effective mentoring is not easy but it is vital and can be extremely rewarding to both individuals. In this interactive session, participants will be asked to share their experiences. Following this session, participants will be able to list characteristics of effective mentoring, distinguish between effective and ineffective mentoring approaches and relationships, and develop effective solutions for problems that might arise between mentors and mentees.

Faculty as Teachers (FasT)

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Harrison Distinguished Associate Professor of Medical Education Research and Instruction/Associate Dean for Medical Education

Course description/learning objectives: This course is designed to introduce teaching faculty to the foundations of education: writing learning objectives, choosing educational methods that align with objectives, and choosing assessment strategies that align with objectives and methods.  Theory is introduced, however, the workshop is mostly hands on for attendees, who work in pairs and small groups.  Following this session, participants will be able to:  identify truly effective learning objectives (using an established, user-friendly framework); discuss the differences between passive and engaged learning; describe two primary learning theories; and make decisions about assessments that provide information about achievement of objectives.

Helping Your Students Learn: Using Kolb’s learning cycle to maximize the impact of your teaching

Presented by Christine Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Lisa K. Rollins, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of Scholarship, Department of Family Medicine.

Course description/learning objectives: Have you ever wanted to gain greater understanding of your preferred learning style and how it might impact both what and how you teach? Or of how students might be able to use information about their own learning styles to positively affect how they study? This session will utilize the Kolb Learning Style Inventory as a foundation for discovery and exploration of learning styles. The session will be highly interactive and will relate to both classroom and clinical teaching. At the session’s conclusion, you will be able to identify and describe your personal preferred learning styles based on the Kolb Learning Style Inventory; describe the qualities associated with each of the learning quadrants: diverging, assimilating, converging and accommodating; explain how these qualities affect choice of teaching methods as well as recommended learning strategies for students; and develop a plan for a learning activity based on Kolb’s Learning Cycle.

How to Develop Effective Inter-professional Education Activities

Presented by Valentina Brashers, MD, FACP, FNAP, Professor of Nursing & Attending Physician in Internal Medicine and John A. Owen, EdD, MSc, Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing and Faculty, CME Office, School of Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: The purpose of this course is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of clinically relevant interprofessional education (IPE) activities by applying theories relevant to IPE and utilizing “collaborative care best practice models,” as an effective approach for creating innovative, evidence-based IPE activities. These models integrate the profession-specific and teamwork behaviors needed for specific practice areas and patient populations as identified by expert clinicians and provide the basis for creating clinically-relevant IPE activities and assessment tools. An opportunity will be provided for participants to develop their own IPE activity using this educational model. Following this session, participants will be able to describe the unique aspects of IPE; state the IPE core competencies; apply theories relevant to IPE to underpin the development, implementation, and evaluation of IPE activities; and demonstrate how to develop and assess an IPE activity based on Collaborative Care Best Practice Models.

Learning, Memory, and Education: Optimizing for Long Term Retention using Adaptive Technology

Presented by Edward C. Nemergut, MD, Frederic A. Berry Professor of Anesthesiology, Professor of Neurosurgery

Course description/learning objectives: This session will highlight recent advances in memory science including generative retrieval, spaced repetition, and interleaved learning. We will review how, using technology, these ideas can be combined with dynamic analytics and “big data” to enhance the user experience and promote long-term retention. Finally, we will discuss how learning experiences can become adaptive. Following this session, participants will be able to recognize how people learn and how our understanding of learning and memory has changed; describe how learning experiences can be enhanced with dynamic analytics and “big data”; describe how technology can improve long term retention; and make rational decisions regarding how to optimize how we teach students, residents, fellows, and one another.

Learning Portfolios and Reflection in Medical Education

Presented by Daniel M. Becker, MD, MPH, MFA, Tussi and John Kluge Professor and Director, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities

Course description/learning objectives: In addition to providing a repository from which students/residents can access important and relevant information over time, learning portfolios can be very effective learning tools. One of the most common outcomes that educators intend for portfolios is reflection. Reflection is a difficult habit to teach without a specific context – a portfolio of the learning artifacts acquired by students as they progress through medical school provides an excellent context for them to reflect on their development and growing maturity. Following this session, participants will be able to describe and apply specific skills and contexts that help to facilitate reflection.

Letters of Recommendation for Medical Students and Residents: Advising, Writing, and Reviewing

Presented by Pamela K. Mason, MD, FHRS, FACC, Associate Professor and Program Director, Cardiovascular Disease Fellowship, Department of Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: Obtaining good quality letters of recommendation is critical for medical students and residents applying for residency and fellowship. However, faculty mentors are often unable to advise trainees in how to solicit letters of recommendation. Many faculty are also not aware of standard formats for these letters and thus are not able to produce high quality letters that effectively communicate information about their mentees. Further, when interviewing candidates for residency and fellowship, they may not be able to identify critical information contained in their letters. The purpose of this lecture is to help faculty understand the principles of high quality letters of recommendation, including “dos and don’ts”, standard formats, and how to understand what another letter writer is “telegraphing” to them. Following this session, participants will be able to: apply standard principles in order to write letters of recommendation that effectively communicate information about trainees and are easily understandable to readers; analyze letters of recommendation for applicants to UVA to gain a complete understanding of the writer’s assessment of the applicants skills’ and abilities; and describe effective mentoring strategies for students and residents applying to training programs who need to solicit letters of recommendation.

Linking Learning Objectives with Methods, Resources, and Assessments

Presented by Casey White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Course description/learning objectives: Even in cases where faculty members are able to write excellent learning objectives, either because of learning beliefs/preferences and/or limitations in time and resources, learning methods might not facilitate achievement of objectives and assessments might not provide evidence that objectives have been achieved. In this workshop, participants will discuss how best to design methods and assessments from learning objectives, barriers to doing so and some ways we might overcome the barriers. Following this session, participants will be able to describe why it is important to begin the course/curriculum design process with learning objectives; discuss barriers to assessing achievement of higher order learning objectives; make decisions about the most appropriate methods and assessment approaches based on a set of specific learning objectives; and evaluate how well linked learning objectives are with methods, resources and assessments.

Maximizing Small Group Teaching and Asking Effective Questions

Presented by John B. Schorling, MD, MPH, Harry T. Peters, Sr. Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences

Course description/learning objectives: Small groups lend themselves to increased engagement among the learners, the instructor, and the content, and are characterized by active participation and contributions by each member of the group. This workshop will address the skills necessary to effectively lead small groups and facilitate small group learning. These skills include asking effective questions that foster discussion and discovery. Following this session, participants will be able to describe the dynamics of small groups, assess the individual needs of group members, and design activities and develop questions that will engage learners to achieve the learning objectives.

NxGen Years 1 & 2: Views from our Learners

Presented by “Mary Kate Worden, PhD Associate Professor of Medical Education Support and Melanie A. McCollum, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell Biology”

Course description/learning objectives: At this session, we assemble a panel of pre-clerkship undergraduate medical students and ask them for feedback on the active-learning sessions they have experienced thus far. What has worked well for them? What has not? How can we better design valuable learning experiences for our students? This is a chance to hear student perspectives on some of the more innovative teaching activities developed by our faculty.

View the VIDEO of the workshop

Precepting Medical Students and Residents in the Outpatient Setting

Presented by Lisa K. Rollins, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of Scholarship, Department of Family Medicine.

Course description/learning objectives: The outpatient clinical learning environment is both an incredibly challenging place to teach and one of the best and most exciting places to teach medicine. The purpose of this session is to identify and address many of the challenges associated with this context and to provide skills to improve participants’ focus and efficiency as clinical teachers. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: identify benefits and challenges to teaching in the outpatient setting; identify common precepting pitfalls; define various levels of learning and how they can be elicited through one’s questioning; and describe and utilize a variety of teaching frameworks for use in the outpatient setting.

Pre-recorded Lectures (PRLs): The key to the flipped classroom—A how-to workshop

Presented by Robin D. LeGallo, MD, Associate Professor of Pathology.

Course description/learning objectives: The flipped classroom requires student preparation and pre-recorded lectures (PRLs) can be a useful tool. The PRL may be the linchpin of a successful flip. This workshop will review the key elements in creating an effective PRL, show clips of highly rated PRLs, introduce available resources, and provide opportunities for participants to brainstorm ideas in areas of their instructional content. Following this workshop, participants will be able to: discuss favorable attributes for successful pre-recorded lectures; list modalities of content delivery; and conceptualize content and delivery ideas in areas of expertise to create an effective pre-recorded lecture.

Professionalism: Defining, Observing, Assessing, and Providing Feedback

Presented by P. Preston Reynolds, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to describe core components of professionalism, list various educational methodologies and the importance of role modeling in teaching professionalism, explain core behaviors relevant for assessment of professionalism, and provide feedback on professionalism to trainees.

Providing Effective Feedback

Presented by Linda A. Waggoner-Fountain, MD, MEd. Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Course description/learning objectives: Giving effective feedback to learners can greatly enhance achievement of learning objectives and can also help them understand how to manage their learning themselves—a skill they will need for lifelong education. Providing feedback, however, is not always intuitive—there are certain elements that can make the difference between feedback that is helpful and feedback that is not. In this workshop, we will review basic principles of effective feedback. Following this session, participants will be able to describe what feedback is and what it is not, describe how and when to give feedback, develop skills in giving feedback, and recognize the importance of providing feedback.

Qualitative Research: What Is It and How Do We Conduct It?

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and Elizabeth B. Bradley, PhD, MEd, Assistant Professor of Research and Director of Curriculum Evaluation

Course description/learning objectives: At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to describe qualitative research in medical education; identify representative research questions best explored with qualitative methodologies; identify data collection approaches best suited to answering qualitative research questions; and compare four quality criteria in qualitative versus quantitative traditions.

Research Design using Qualitative Methodology

Presented by Elizabeth B. Bradley, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Director of Curriculum Evaluation

Course description/learning objectives: Are you a natural observer of things around you or a story teller? Do you appreciate the richness of words?  Then you may want to try your hand at qualitative research. Come learn more about qualitative research and how it enables investigators to look at phenomena and data from a different perspective.  At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:  describe qualitative research in medical education; identify representative research questions effectively explored with qualitative methodologies; identify data collection approaches best suited to answering qualitative research questions; and compare four quality criteria in qualitative versus quantitative approaches

Research Design using Quantitative Methodology

Presented by James Martindale, Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Director of Test Development

Course description/learning objectives: Deductive reasoning. Correlation.  Causality.  Random assignment.  Do these words make you anxious?  Well you are not alone!  But these guiding principles of quantitative research methodology need not be intimidating.  This session will focus on some of the major strategies employed when answering research questions using a quantitative approach.  At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to: describe quantitative research in medical education; identify representative research questions effectively explored with quantitative methodologies; and identify data collection approaches best suited to answering quantitative research questions.

Searching the Medical Education Literature

Presented by Karen V. Knight, MSLS, Medical Education Librarian

Course description/learning objectives: This hands-on workshop will review several databases (MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycInfo) to conduct their own research into the medical education literature, either for classroom application or research). Following this session, participants will be able to search appropriate databases and list resources within the Health Sciences Library if they have questions.

Setting Expectations for Learners: Writing Good Learning Objectives

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Course description/learning objectives: This session will help faculty write good objectives for their course/module. Following this workshop, participants will be able to identify high-quality objectives i.e., those that provide specific information to students about intentions and expectations that include the four elements of effective objectives (audience, behavior, condition, degree); write effective learning objectives in the domains of knowledge, skills, and attitude; and evaluate and critique learning objectives written by others.

Setting the Stage for Scholarship: Applying a Scholarly Approach to the Work you do with Learners

Presented by Maryellen E. Gusic, MD. Professor of Medical Education & Senior Advisor for Educational Affairs

Course description/learning objectives: In this interactive session, participants will delineate the domain in which they most frequently work with learners and apply Glassick’s criteria for excellence in scholarly work to a current or planned activity involving learners. Using a structured planning tool, attendees will be able to transform an innovative idea into an opportunity for scholarship. The workshop will incorporate hands-on exercises and small group discussions during which peers will provide feedback and allow participants to partner in making a commitment to action to advance their work as educators. By the end of the learning activity, participants will be able to define the elements of a scholarly approach across the domains of educator activities; explore ways to apply a scholarly approach to design, refine or enhance a current educational activity; and identify opportunities/venues for educational scholarship in your daily work with learners.

Simulation in Medical Education

Presented by Keith E. Littlewood, MD, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Assistant Dean for Clinical Skills Education

Course description/learning objectives: This interactive session will include a short history of simulation and discussion of current simulation-based educational approaches. Participants will assist in the identification and development of new uses of simulation-based education in UVA’s health sciences educational programs. Following this session, participants will be able to describe the different modalities of simulation currently available and their associated educational value; examine the application of simulation in their teaching activities; and describe representative simulation-based applications in UME, GME and CME at the national level.

Submitting an Abstract

Presented by Elizabeth B. Bradley, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Director of Curriculum Evaluation, James Martindale, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Director of Test Development, and Maryellen E. Gusic, MD, Professor of Medical Education & Senior Advisor for Educational Affairs

Teaching, Learning, and Student Success: How Faculty Make a Difference

Presented by Josipa Roksa, Professor of Sociology and Education, Director of Graduate Studies (Sociology), Senior Advisor for Academic Programs (Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost)

Course description/learning objectives: Whether teaching, mentoring, or advising, faculty play a role in student success. Sometimes we do not even know the impact we have made until years later, when students reflect on their experiences and our role in their success (and at times failure). With a potential for great impact comes also great responsibility. This responsibility is heightened today as we enroll an increasingly diverse student body. In this interactive session, we will combine research and our collective wisdom to consider ways in which we can make a difference, particularly for traditionally underserved students. Following this session, participants will be familiar with the empirical research on the relationship between faculty practices and student success; will understand the importance of faculty practices for diverse populations; and will develop potential ideas for their own engagement with students.

Team-Based Learning

Presented by Mary Kate Worden, PhD, Associate Professor of Medical Education Support

Course description/learning objectives: Team-based learning (TBL) is an active learning method involving preparation outside the classroom for higher-order activities and collaborative learning in the classroom. Following this session, participants will be able to explain the key components of a successful TBL module, outline how they would construct a TBL module from a set of objectives, describe how they might convert a course/lecture they already teach into a TBL module, and illustrate how to transform a small group into a productive learning team.

The Art of Presenting: Catching Your Audience Hook, Line, and Sinker

Presented by Stephen J. Wolf, MD, FACEP, Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs, Department of Emergency Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: Ever wondered how to better engage your learners during large group presentations? This talk will introduce a non-traditional approach using learning theory and a “learning in action” model to help ensure you engage your learners, hold their attention, and avoid “brain drift.” At the conclusion of this presentation participants will be able to: list the themes of effective learning; describe a better construct for large group presentations; prepare a presentation based on a paradigm of learning in action; and list strategies for how to avoid “disengaging” your learners.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Providing Effective Feedback

Presented by Linda A. Waggoner-Fountain, MD, Med, Professor of Pediatrics and Kambiz Kalantari, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: Giving effective feedback to learners can greatly enhance achievement of learning objectives and can also help them understand how to manage their learning themselves—a skill they will need for lifelong education. Providing feedback, however, is not always intuitive—there are certain elements that can make the difference between feedback that is helpful and feedback that is not. In this workshop, we will review basic principles of effective feedback.  Following this highly interactive session, participants will be able to describe what feedback is and what it is not, describe how and when to give feedback, develop skills in giving feedback, and recognize the importance of providing feedback.

The Hidden Curriculum, Revisited

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Course description/learning objectives: This workshop is designed to discuss the effect of the “hidden curriculum” on what we are teaching our medical students and what we expect them to achieve by graduation. This will be a highly interactive session and attendees should expect to introduce their ideas and opinions about the hidden curriculum and its impact on medical student education. Following this session, participants will be able to differentiate the formal, informal and “hidden” curricula in medical student education; determine the impact of the hidden curriculum in pre-clerkship and clerkship phases of medical student education; and make decisions about how to address the hidden curriculum.

The Struggling Learner

Presented by Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Course description/learning objectives: Even experienced faculty and administrators can be challenged by learners who have met or exceeded criteria for admission, but then begin to struggle. This workshop is designed to foster a discussion about diagnosing particular problems that interfere with meeting objectives, how to think about providing relevant and effective assistance, and, if needed, ending the learner’s enrollment in the program. Following this session, participants will be able to identify problems that are within his/her knowledge and skillset to address directly, and when problems indicate external skills/testing are needed; describe specific steps to take in isolating and diagnosing a problem; and formulate a specific plan of action to address problems.

Triangles, Not Just for Geometry Anymore! Strategies to Improve Situational Awareness in Critical Incidents Using the Triangular Spacing Method

Presented by Curtis L. Stowers, MSN, RN ACNS-BC and Katie L. Smith, MSN, RN, CMSRN, UVA School of Nursing

Course description/learning objectives: Participants will complete a highly interactive critical incident scenario. The triangular spacing method will be introduced, and the participants will re-run the code scenario implementing the new spacing method. The final de-brief will include interaction conversations regarding how situational awareness and communication improve with the integration of the spacing method into critical incidents. Following this session, participants will be able to apply situational awareness by integrating the triangular spacing method into clinical simulation and practice; improve closed loop communication in critical incidents; and successfully integrate members of the multidisciplinary team into a critical incident.  The session will enhance the knowledge and skills of educators by providing them with a new method to develop in their own practice. Advising and mentoring newer health care providers is an important component of education. Applying the concept of situational awareness assists the providers in becoming more effective team members during a critical incident. This session advances the educators’ skills in applying a scholarly approach in an interactive scenario that closely mirrors daily practice. The healthcare providers that can apply the triangular spacing method during a critical incident, the more likely situational awareness improves. That concept is a scholarly approach to advance the field of education.

Turning Medical Education Activities into Scholarship

Presented by Paul Haidet, MD, MPH, Penn State University

Course description/learning objectives: Participants should bring to the workshop an idea of a topic on which they’d like to publish. The presenter will lead a discussion and facilitate small-group conversations regarding those ideas. In small groups, participants would receive feedback on their ideas. The goal of this session is for participants to leave with an action plan for bringing their research idea to fruition through publication. Participation in this workshop will be counted toward the Next Generation Curriculum Certificate.

Understanding and Supporting Professional Identity Formation Using the Kegan Model of Adult Identity Development

Presented by Donna T. Chen, MD MPH, Associate Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities Departments of Public Health Sciences, and Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences

Course description/learning objectives: This session will introduce Dr. Robert Kegan’s model of adult identity development and its usefulness in supporting appropriate professional identity formation in medicine. Kegan describes five stages of increased complexity that determine individuals’ world views and guide their behavior. Much of the development described by Kegan occurs during young adulthood, the same time frame in which learners in medicine are forming their professional identities, and thus can affect the way they understand and demonstrate professionalism. This session is adapted from a workshop presented at AAMC 2017 to allow attendees to explore specific ways Kegan’s model might be useful here at UVA. Following completion of this learning activity, participants will be able to describe the key attributes of the most common Kegan identity stages in adults; recognize the key elements that help foster a successful transition between Kegan identity stages; describe the limitations in using brief interpersonal interactions to predict Kegan identity stages; and explain how the behavior described in a real case might be understood using Kegan identity stages and how that understanding can help guide the interaction as it unfolds.

Using Analogies to Power Up Learning and Transfer

Presented by Weichao (Vera) Chen, PhD, Instructional Designer, Medical Education

Course description/learning objectives: ‘‘We see the world in terms of what we have seen already’’ – Susan A. Greenfield, neuroscientist, in The Private Life of the Brain: Emotions, Consciousness, and the Secret of the Self (page 65). Whether realizing it or not, you probably have already been using analogies in your teaching. This workshop will explore how analogy has been involved in our everyday reasoning and thinking and the possibilities that exist to enhance our students’ concept learning and problem-solving transfer. After attending this workshop, participants will be able to describe the basic components of an analogy; explain (at least two) factors that would influence the success of analogical transfer occurring; develop several analogs/analogues to teach a target concept in your domain; and identify a way to facilitate your students’ analogical transfer during their problem solving

Using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory to Inform Your Teaching

Presented by Lisa Rollins, PhD, MEd, Associate Professor of Family Medicine

Course description/learning objectives: The basis of Experiential Learning Theory is that we learn through our experiences; specifically, our knowledge is created through the transformation of experience. This is the foundation of the Kolb Learning Style Inventory. This inventory considers learning preferences along two axes: 1) doing/ reflecting, and 2) experiencing/thinking. While we can identify our preferred style within a specific quadrant created by these axes, this theory postulates that learners derive deeper meaning by moving through all 4 quadrants. The purpose of this session is to introduce participants to Kolb theory by: identifying and understanding our personal learning preferences; identifying the qualities associated with the 4 quadrants; considering how these qualities affect our interactions; and applying Kolb to the design of teaching encounters. The session will be highly interactive and will relate to both classroom and clinical teaching. At the session’s conclusion, participants will be able to identify and describe their personal preferred learning styles based on the Kolb Learning Style Inventory; describe the qualities associated with each of the learning quadrants: diverging, assimilating, converging and accommodating; explain how these qualities affect interactions; describe how to apply Kolb to teaching encounters to create deep learning; identify a repertoire of activities that they can implement as they teach in order to move learners through each of the 4 quadrants; and outline a sample teaching session utilizing Kolb experiential learning theory.

Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions

Presented by Christine M. Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Course description/learning objectives: While there is some controversy over the effectiveness of multiple-choice questions in assessing higher order cognitive skills, there are also guidelines to ensure that the test questions you write are aligned with the level of learning you expect and truly reflect the knowledge/skills you want students to demonstrate. The biggest problem with MCQs is that good ones are hard to write—and they are even harder to write for those who are experts in their disciplines. Following this workshop, participants will be able to evaluate when MCQs are an appropriate approach to assessment, describe the elements of good MCQs, and list common pitfalls to avoid when writing MCQs.

Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions: Basic Workshop

Presented by Christine M. Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Course description/learning objectives: STEP 1: Prerequisite: Complete the online NBME Item-Writing tutorial – the tutorial will take approximately 45 minutes and you can stop and resume at will. STEP 2: Follow-up this tutorial by practicing writing a few questions about what you teach. STEP 3: Write 3-5 MCQs to bring with you to the workshop. The workshop will be offered on two separate dates (please see dates/times, above): please only attend one of these sessions, as they are the same workshop. Bring your newly expanded knowledge to the workshop, and help others by reviewing their questions.

Writing Multiple Choice Questions That Assess Learning Objectives at Higher Cognitive Levels

Presented by Christine Peterson, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Course description/learning objectives: This interactive workshop is designed for individuals who have experience writing basic (lower-order) multiple choice items that assess recall or comprehension for tests and who want to learn how to transform their items so they are assessing higher-order cognition (assessing application or analysis). Participants will discuss items that do and do not achieve this goal (and why) and will practice transforming their own items with feedback from colleagues. Following this workshop, participants will be able to distinguish test items that assess higher-order cognition from those that assess lower-order cognition and transform their lower order items to higher-order items.